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Visiting Artists

October / November 2011:


Melissa Terrezza, in her own words:

My work as an artist focuses on the process of image transfer onto clay. The images used pertain to my life and memory provoking multiple conversations of a subject matter building an artistic expression. Most of my work consists of wall mounted tiles and three dimensional objects as a foundation for building a voice in a visual world. The ideas behind my work reference the need for a shift in perspective relating to nature in an industrialized, governed society.

Through rediscovering my Native American roots, motifs are drawn from traditional Lakota (Sioux) beliefs and ceremonies combined with images of contemporary America. Searching for my ancestral ways and learning about the lives of Native Americans has inspired my work to question the behavior of modern society. The effects of man regarding greed have become damaging, especially among the Native American nations. An old grid of a Sioux Indian reservation is often used in my tiles as a reminder of their current living conditions on American soil. Within my work I compare native symbols to modern images, such as trains, telephone poles, and money, illustrating the shift from nature to an industrialized society.

Having a love for clay, a natural material from the earth, it’s surface is versatile and is used to manifest these conceptual ideas. Thru traditional Lakota practices, ceremonies, and songs, knowledge and inspiration are gained and applied to the art while a personal journey of growth and self awareness is explored during the art making process.

My studio is shared with three other artists on the Flood Gallery level. You can find more of my work through the big metal refrigerator door, in the back left hand corner of the studio.

Read more about Melissa here.

 

November / December 2010:

Claire Elizabeth Barratt, Director of Cilla Vee

Claire Elizabeth Barratt, director of Cilla Vee, has a Dance and Musical Theater background, with training received in her native country of Britain at the London Studio Center of Performing Arts and the Laban Center for Movement and Dance.

She spent ten years in the southern states of Tennessee and North Carolina, where she held the position of Co–Director for “Circle Modern Dance” and was a company member of “Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre”, as well as choreographing for Opera and Musical Theater plus cross-disciplinary collaborations and other independent projects.

Based in New York, she founded “Cilla Vee Movement Projects”, a multi-disciplinary performing arts organization, and has performed in the US, Canada, Europe and Japan. She served a one year apprenticeship with Lori Belilove & Company of the Isadora Duncan Dance Foundation, is performance curator for Bronx based Gallery “Haven Arts” and is currently an adjunct faculty member of DanceSpace 637 in Ottawa, Ontario.

Claire has been featured in Art Basel Miami, the Washington DC International Improv Festival, the Transmodern Age and High Zero Festivals in Baltimore, MD and the Dans/CE Kapital Festival in Ottawa.
Much of her work focuses on collaboration with live music in an improvisational context. She also specializes in “Installation”.

“She channeled Ann Reinking, slinking in place with legs arching and arms rolling out. It was an unqualified success;” Christopher Correa – Dance View Times

http://www.cillavee.com/claire.html

September / October:


Melissa Terrezza, in her own words:

My work as an artist focuses on the process of image transfer onto clay. The images used pertain to my life and memory provoking multiple conversations of a subject matter building an artistic expression. Most of my work consists of wall mounted tiles and three dimensional objects as a foundation for building a voice in a visual world. The ideas behind my work reference the need for a shift in perspective relating to nature in an industrialized, governed society.

Through rediscovering my Native American roots, motifs are drawn from traditional Lakota (Sioux) beliefs and ceremonies combined with images of contemporary America. Searching for my ancestral ways and learning about the lives of Native Americans has inspired my work to question the behavior of modern society. The effects of man regarding greed have become damaging, especially among the Native American nations. An old grid of a Sioux Indian reservation is often used in my tiles as a reminder of their current living conditions on American soil. Within my work I compare native symbols to modern images, such as trains, telephone poles, and money, illustrating the shift from nature to an industrialized society.

Having a love for clay, a natural material from the earth, it’s surface is versatile and is used to manifest these conceptual ideas. Thru traditional Lakota practices, ceremonies, and songs, knowledge and inspiration are gained and applied to the art while a personal journey of growth and self awareness is explored during the art making process.

My studio is shared with three other artists on the Flood Gallery level. You can find more of my work through the big metal refrigerator door, in the back left hand corner of the studio.

Read more about Melissa here.

 

 

 

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